Thursday, May 28, 2009

God Is Never Unsure

Another thought from A. W. Tozer

"All of God’s acts are consistent with all of his attributes. No attribute contradicts any other, but all harmonize and blend into each other in the infinite abyss of the Godhead. All that God does agrees with all that God is, and being and doing are one in him. The familiar picture of God as often torn between his justice and his mercy is altogether false to the facts. To think of God as inclining first toward one and then toward another of his attributes is to imagine a God who is unsure of himself, frustrated and emotionally unstable, which of course is to say that the one of whom we are thinking is not the true God at all but a weak, mental reflection of him badly out of focus."

From The Attributes of God by A.W. Tozer

Friday, May 22, 2009

Is Your Conception of God Right?

A.W. Tozer rightly said, "What comes to our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us?"

Only a correct, biblical perception of God will provide us with the foundation we need to truly worship Him for who He really is. Anything less is idolatry. John MacArthur says in his book, The Love of God, "A proper conception of God provides the foundation of all that is absolutely essential to spiritual life and health."

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

How Smart Preachers Help Propagate Dumb Ideas

While I don't whole heartedly agree with everything that Larry Osborne, Pastor of North Coast Church, says in this article, I must admit that he has caused me to rethink my practice of putting Scripture verses up on the screen or even in the sermon outline. While many of First Baptist members tell me how much they appreciate the outline with the Scripture verses in it, I have recognized lately that many members do not bring their Bibles to church. There is much more to the article, however. Although I edited the article for length, it is still rather lengthy but worth taking the time to read. You can read the whole article here.

Life is nuanced, and so are the scriptures. They can't be reduced to sound bites and tag lines. Yet the sad truth is that many people in our churches base their faith almost entirely upon clichés and sound bites rather than the totality of scripture. In other words, some awfully smart Christians believe some really dumb things.

For instance, in my travels around the country, I've come to believe that a majority of Christians would agree with most, if not all, of the following statements.

Faith Can Fix Anything
Forgiving Means Forgetting
A Godly Home Guarantees Godly Kids
God Has A Blueprint For My Life
Christians Shouldn't Judge
Everything Happens For A Reason
Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide
God Brings Good Luck
A Valley Means A Wrong Turn
Dead People Go To A Better Place

And these are just a few of the clichés, myths, and spiritual urban legends that permeate our churches. They sound plausible. They make for nice tag lines on posters, T-shirts, and Jesus junk. But if depended upon, they ultimately produce disappointment and disillusionment when God fails to come through on a promise he never made.

Frankly, as pastors and preachers, we're partly to blame. We do a number of things in the design of our worship services and the delivery of our sermons that unintentionally give life to these kinds of empty promises and clichés. We don't do it on purpose. But we do it just the same.

How do these (and other) spiritual urban legends work their way into our sermons and churches? A variety of things come into play.

First, many of them align with the dominate beliefs and values of our culture. The more widely believed something is, the less likely we are to question it. Just like everyone else, Christians tend to trust the wisdom of the majority – even though the Bible makes a good case for taking a poll and then heading in the opposite direction.

Second, most of these goofy ideas match up with what we'd like to believe. For instance, the confidence that faith can fix anything or the comfort that comes from believing that dead people always go to a better place fits nicely with what we'd all like to believe. So any time a pastor says anything even remotely close, that's what people tend to hear, even if it's not what we said.

Third, these ideas are usually passed on by reputable sources. Christian friends, Sunday school teachers, and Bible study leaders often offer them as well-meaning encouragement or advice. And since the source is reputable, people tend to believe what they say and pass it on in much the same way that computer viruses, Internet rumors, and secular urban legends are passed on. We don't bother to double-check them before hitting the Send button because the source is reputable.

Frankly, there's not much a pastor can do to completely kill off these dumb ideas and happy-talk clichés. But there are some things we can do in our services and preaching to undercut their credibility and to make it less likely that our people will buy into them or pass them on to others.
Here are four of the things that I've found to be most helpful in my own ministry and preaching.

Many of us unintentionally designed our worship services and sermons so that no one needs to bring (or even own) a Bible. The biggest culprit is the pattern of putting Bible verses and texts up on a screen.

Admittedly, our intentions are admirable (a desire to make the Bible accessible to those who are unfamiliar with scripture or don't yet have a Bible). But the unintended consequences are not so admirable. Whether it's in a youth group or a church service, once we start putting the text up on a screen or in the bulletin, it won't be long until most people stop bringing a Bible. Why should they? They don't need it.

As a result, it starts a vicious cycle. When new Christians (and lots of other Christians) don't see anyone else carrying a Bible, they don't either. It's not long until the mark of a visitor is someone with a Bible in hand.

But that's nowhere near as harmful as the next result. Newer Christians and immature Christians start to put their trust in the spiritual guru who stands up each weekend and authoritatively unpacks the deep truths and life-wisdom found in an ancient and cryptic book called the Bible. Once that happens, they're wide open to clichés, platitudes, and anything else that has a nice ring to it. They have nothing to test them against.

That's one reason that at North Coast Church, I've refused to put our sermon text or even cross-references up on a screen. I want to literally force people to get and use a Bible if they want to follow along. The result has been lots of people bringing Bibles – and new Christians who quickly assume that they'd better get one to fit in with everyone else.

When it comes to ministry, my goals are simple. They're probably a lot like yours. I want to help non-Christians come to Christ (John 14:6). I want to help new Christians grow to maturity (Colossians 1:28-29). And I want to help all Christians learn to spiritually feed themselves and think Biblically (Acts 17:11). Yet the third step is hard to pull off when no one brings (or even owns) a Bible. It's difficult to move people beyond sound bites and sermon notes if they don't have a Bible to check them against.

Another way I try to undercut simplistic clichés and half-truths is by making sure my sermons include the context of a passage and not just the proof texts that support whatever points I'm trying to make.

At North Coast Church we use a combination of book studies and topical series in our preaching. We work very hard to be practical and relevant. In so doing, it can be tempting to give people principles and life applications supported by a laundry list of verses – some of which are taken way out of context. (I known none of you have ever done this, but I'll admit I have.)

While supplying verses that support a principle or life application is important, I've found that it's also essential to get people to actually turn to the passages and see them in context. Doing so helps them grasp that the Bible is not just a collection of pithy sayings mined by a clever pastor. It drives home the subtle message that some verses don't mean what they seem to mean in isolation – and this goes a long way toward undercutting the happy-talk and clichés that are so often built upon a favorite text or even a single sentence taken out of context.

As an added benefit, it also pulls the rug out from under the false teaching of many cults. Many of their most bizarre doctrines are built on a phrase or verse taken completely out of context.

Another thing I try to do when preaching is to make sure that I acknowledge and address as many of the "yeah buts" that I can imagine my listeners asking. For instance if I'm preaching from a passage that deals with God's sovereignty, I know that some folks out there are asking, "Yeah, but does that mean God is responsible for . . .?" or "Yeah, but does that mean God actually caused Adam and Eve to sin?" plus a host of other questions.

Acknowledging the "Yeah buts," and especially questions for which I have no answer, makes a big difference. It doesn't undercut their trust in the Bible, but it does undercut their blind trust in me. And that's a good thing. It helps my congregation understand that the scriptures are nuanced, complex, and don't always hold an easy cliché or simple answer for every situation. It sends a strong message that the Bible is more than a collection of Zen-like sayings to be cataloged and then pulled out and applied when needed.

The fact is, smart people will always believe some dumb things. Blind spots are nothing new; they will always be with us. But the way we structure our sermons, worship services, and ministry can go a long way toward either fostering or exposing these spiritual urban legends and empty clichés for the baloney they are.

Monday, May 11, 2009

God Has Not Called You to Be Tolerant

Great thought from Jason Cruise at

It is amazing thing to live in the day in which we do. A truly amazing time period in our nation's history as we live out what looks to be the slippery slope headed toward our becoming a nation that has lost it's ability to possess any level of common sense. We now blame "crime" on guns - which is the equivalent of blaming arson on matches. Our nation is working hard to celebrate same sex marriage - yet if that were God's plan for marriage then the human race would literally self-destruct out of simple inability to procreate.

One issue that so deeply permeates our present culture is the idea of tolerance.

Tolerance, by definition, is that you and I can peacefully coexist though we are two different people with polar opposite value systems. Yet that is not how tolerance is being practiced today.

Tolerance has now shifted in it's practical definition in that it has come to mean that you must fully embrace and totally endorse any form of value system, and if you do not, then you are a hateful, anti-intellect who lives in the squalor of bigotry. We are now raising future generations to believe that they have the right never to be offended. Here's the funny thing about this idea of tolerance ... those who preach it are the most intolerant group walking the planet! Those who preach tolerance demand that you be completely tolerant of their way of life, for if you are not, then you are boycotted and treated as if you are not worthy of the name "human being."

Here's the truth friend: God has never called you to be tolerant.

He has called you to be graceful. He has called you to be patient. He has called you to be loving. He has never, nor will He ever, call you to tolerate any belief system that seeks to destroy the very concepts of His identity and holiness. You do not have to be tolerant of any other "gospel" than that of Jesus Christ. You do not have to be tolerant of any form of alternative lifestyle that feeds on selfish sexual depravity. You do not have to be tolerant of any thing, in any form, that contradicts the absolute holy character of Holy God.

"... be on your guard so that you may not be carried away by the error of lawless men and fall from your secure position. But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. To him be glory both now and forever!" 2 Peter 3:17-18